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Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

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  #81 Old 05-11-2011 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

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Originally Posted by surayahamdan View Post
I don't find bending down to one's uncontrollable urges to have sex to be anywhere near the term "progress".
No, but I don't suppose calling for the end of discrimination based on sexuality and instead encouraging treatment of all individuals with respect and compassion is a retardation, now, is it?

Because that's what Seksualiti Merdeka is about. Just in case you don't know.
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  #82 Old 05-11-2011 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

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Originally Posted by surayahamdan View Post

Well animals practice Seks Bebas too. I don't know why anyone would consider that cool.

By the way, that's sarcasm, my dear.
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What do you say,
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  #83 Old 06-11-2011 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

***

If you can't get sarcasm, then try not to read the following passage, taken from Malaysia-Today.net.

NO HOLDS BARRED

Raja Petra Kamarudin

Sometimes I wonder whether Hitler could have been right after all. He took action against gays and Jews and so do we. He dreamed of a national car and so do we. He wanted the tallest, biggest, longest, etc. building to be erected in Germany and so do we. He believed in Ketuanan German and so do we -- Ketuanan Melayu. Nazi Germany and Malaysia are almost like carbon copies.

Quote:
At mosques, strident protests against sexuality festival

(The Malaysian Insider) - Within minutes of ending their Friday prayers at the National Mosque here today, Perkasa sounded the clarion call for Muslims to defend their faith being sullied by organisers of a three-year-old sexuality festival.

Springing into action, the vocal Malay rights group?s youth chief Irwan Fahmi Ideris called on Malays to unite and set aside their political differences to reject homosexuality.

Backed by 30 demonstrators and under the watchful eye of 20 policemen at the mosque compound, Irwan raged against the Malaysian Bar for backing organisers of the Seksualiti Merdeka programme.

?Lawyers are not qualified to be called lawyers for giving support to Seksualiti Malaysia,? he yelled, drawing the attention of some 30 onlookers.

The small group of demonstrators swiftly moved to cross the road where another Perkasa leader said they would deliver a memorandum to the city?s Islamic religious department demanding it obtain an immediate court order to stop organisers of the Seksualiti Merdeka programme.

The memo, signed by Perkasa chief Datuk Ibrahim Ali, reads: ?We believe what the festival organiser is promoting clears goes against the teachings and demands of Islam. Promotion of this festival has sullied and insulted the purity of Islam.?

In Shah Alam, a group of 10 demonstrators making similar demands rallied outside the Selangor state mosque.

Chanting ?Allahuakbar?, the protestors held green placards that read in Malay: ?Don?t hide behind human rights. Respect our human rights as Muslims in Malaysia? and ?Suhakam, don?t be the anti-Islamic enemy?s tool?.
**********************************************

Quote:
It's not a pride parade, say organisers

(New Straits Times) - The organisers of Seksualiti Merdeka yesterday claimed that the event was not aimed at promoting homosexuality but to champion rights of lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgenders (LGBT).

The event's co-founder, Pang Khee Teik, said it "is not a pride parade" but a series of talks, forums, workshops, art, theatre and music performances, interactive installations, and film screenings organised by a coalition of Malaysian non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

Pang said the event was aimed at stopping discrimination, harassment and violence towards one's sexual orientation and gender preference.

It is organised by a coalition of Malaysian NGOs including the Malaysian Bar Council, Suara Rakyat Malaysia (Suaram), Empower, PT Foundation, United Nations and Amnesty International.

"We hope to create a platform for the community. Some people say this is Western influenced but that is not true as the LGBT community exists across the world and we even have a small population in our country."

Pang explained that keeping quiet had not helped the community as many were subjected to high levels of hostility and violence.

Bar Council president Lim Chee Wee said all human beings should be treated equally.

"Individuals have the right to make their own choices in sexual orientation and gender identity in the spirit of equality."

The Malaysian Bar's stand is embodied, in particular, in the first three principles of The Yogyakarta Principles on the Application of International Human Rights Law in relation to sexual orientation and gender identity, which are; the right to the universal enjoyment of human rights, the rights to equality and non-discrimination and the right to recognition before the law.

"In Malaysia, the LGBT community has long been treated as 'outsiders' as they face numerous hardships, including a lack of personal safety due to harassment by civil and Syariah authorities, living in fear of prosecution for the private acts of consenting adults, and constantly facing public discrimination and denigration."

PT Foundation acting executive director Raymond Tai said their primary focus was on HIV prevention and care and support for the community most affected by HIV.
**********************************************

It is good that 30 Perkasa activists demonstrated against gays. At least the view of more than one billion Muslims worldwide has been heard today. And the added benefit to this is that Malays are finally united, which was what Umno has been trying to do for some time but thus far has failed. Now, finally, PAS and Umno are speaking as one voice. And this augurs well for Malay unity.

The PPSMI issue is another issue that has united PAS and Umno. The way things are currently going it appears like the future of the Malays is assured after all after the shock on the March 2008 general election when there was much anxiety that the Malays are going to be reduced to second-class citizens in their own country.

At last, PAS and Umno are seeing the light and have woken up to the reality that the future of the Malays rests in a united PAS-Umno and, failing which, there will be a real danger that the Chinese will take control of the country, like what has happened in Penang and, if we are not careful, will also happen in Selangor.

The organisers of Seksualiti Merdeka talk about championing the rights of lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgenders. Hello brader?..what rights are you talking about? Lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgenders have no rights, okay? Only straight people have rights. In fact, even oral sex is a crime in Malaysia in case you were not aware.

These people are all perverts. Why can?t they be normal like the rest of us? I was told that as high as 50% of Malaysians may have homosexual tendencies even if they do not actually act on these tendencies.

That is very frightening. Imagine every second person you see on the street may have gay tendencies. That is an alarmingly high rate. And I was told that homosexuality amongst Malays is higher than amongst non-Malays. And that is the even more alarming thing if it is true considering that Malays are Muslims and are supposed to be very pious and god-fearing and will never harm people, take bribes or steal the rakyat?s money.

I think we must push this anti-gay effort even further. PAS and Umno, and the Christians who are true Christians, should pass a new law in Parliament to make it mandatory for every Malaysian to go through a polygraph test to determine whether he or she has gay tendencies. That would be easy enough to detect. Then, once these people have been detected, their identity cards can be marked accordingly so that we know who these people are.

We probably can also make them wear a star on their chest or something like that, like what the Nazis did to the Jews in Germany. In fact, since Malaysia is anti-Jew and anti-homosexual, just like Nazi Germany, this move would be very appropriate. The law can even stipulate that all Jews and homosexuals must wear a star on their chest -- maybe a yellow star for Jews and a pink star for gays.

It is not enough we take action against professed homosexuals. Even closet homosexuals must be hunted down. We know that only 1% of those who are homosexuals reveal themselves or ?come out of the closet?. This means another 99% remain hidden. So we need to flush them out and take action against them ? like what we do for apostates, Wahabbis, Shias, etc.

It does not matter even if they are merely thinking about it and do not actually act on their homosexual tendencies. Even thinking is a crime in Malaysia and is also not allowed in Islam.

Do you know that Malaysia has a law called the Internal Security Act (ISA) that detains people who think the wrong thing? Ex-Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad told us this. He said that it is no use arresting someone after the crime has been committed. You need to detain them before they commit the crime even as they are thinking about it.

Many Malaysians have in fact been detained for thinking the wrong thing. For example, those who think that Shia is the correct version of Islam have been detained over the last many years and were sent for rehabilitation. Many of them were university lecturers and religious scholars. Recently, some people from PSM were detained under suspicion that they were thinking about Communism.

So there is no harm in arresting people for thinking the wrong thing. Malaysia has been doing this for years, before some of you were even born. So, if you have gay tendencies, then this means the government can arrest you. Thinking that gay is right is no different from thinking that Shiism or Communism are right. If the government can detain you for one crime then why not for the other?

Sometimes I wonder whether Hitler could have been right after all. He took action against gays and Jews and so do we. He dreamed of a national car and so do we. He wanted the tallest, biggest, longest, etc. building to be erected in Germany and so do we. He believed in Ketuanan German and so do we -- Ketuanan Melayu. Nazi Germany and Malaysia are almost like carbon copies.

Heil Najib!
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What do you say to jumping off the edge?
Never knowing if there's solid ground below
Or hand to hold, or hell to pay,
What do you say,
What do you say?"

And thus laments the hopeless romantic that is yours truly.
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  #84 Old 06-11-2011 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

Here is something Marina Mahathir recently posted on her blog :

Quote:
Making Room for One Another

Folks, this was a note (below) I wrote about two years ago after I saw the documentary 'Jihad for Love'. I thought, given the events of recent days, that it was timely to let a wider audience read it.

There may be those who say we should not even talk about this, that to do so would somehow disturb public order. But how have we been able to respond to anything without seeking knowledge about it first? Are we not enjoined to learn before we react? Or do we simply respond based on whims, fancies and rumours? Is that what we call an intelligent response, or do we not care whether our responses are intelligent or not? And how does this urge to constantly punish benefit us? Does it make us feel better about ourselves when we punish someone else?

It so happened that recently a report on Muslim LGBTs in the US came out. Not all of it is relevant to us here in Malaysia but some of it is interesting and enlightening. Read it here and then, if you want, criticise it. But please don't react without reading it.

Al-Quran 58:11 (Asad) O YOU who have attained to faith! When you are told, “Make room for one another in your collective life”, do make room: [and in return,] God will make room for you [in His grace]. And whenever you are told, “Rise up [for a good deed]”, do rise up; [and] God will exalt by [many] degrees those of you who have attained to faith and, [above all,] such as have been vouchsafed [true] knowledge: for God is fully aware of all that you do.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jihad for Love: My Response to the Movie
October 5, 2009


I watched a film last night which moved me so much I felt I had to write about it. At the post-movie discussion I felt so inarticulate in expressing what I felt about it that it kept me up all night. So in order to exorcise those thoughts from my head, I thought I would put them down here.

The movie was 'Jihad for Love' by Parvez Sharma, made in 2007. It is essentially about the plight of several gay Muslims, men and women, around the world including a gay Imam in South Africa, a gay Egyptian man who is forced into exile in France, some gay Iranian men also forced into exile after undergoing torture ( 100 lashes in one case) and some Egyptian and Turkish lesbian women.

My response to it is from that of a Muslim woman who believes that Islam is based on justice, equality and compassion and who wants to fight the injustices perpetuated in the name of Islam from within.

The first thing that struck me about all the gay people in the movie was how religious they were. Indeed, far more than me. To them, praying and seeking help from God was the most natural thing. No doubt the Imam from South Africa had far more formal training than the rest but it impressed me that all of them, without exception, were always conscious of God, of their duties as Muslims. Furthermore in seeking to find answers to what they view as sexual orientations that they are born with and cannot help, it is to God and religion that they turn to, nowhere else. Not a single one seemed to have turned to drugs or anything. Certainly the idea of abandoning religion totally seemed not to have occurred to any of them.

Secondly, they all seemed like very loving family people. The imam was in fact a divorced father of three and the scenes with his children, who clearly adore him, are particularly touching. He has not hidden the fact that he is gay from them because he is out in the open but their love for him and declarations of support should anyone try to harm him underscored to me what family values is supposed to be about.

Similarly with the others. The young men forced into exile are seen phoning their mothers and the conversations are clearly emotional. Their mothers miss them, they miss their mothers. They all wish they did not have to be apart. I was intrigued that the Egyptian's conversation had so many references to religion ( as in "I have wonderful news today on the Prophet's birthday!) including ending the conversation with his mother saying "There is no God but God" and him responding, "And Mohamad is the Prophet of God." Perhaps this is typical of Egyptian culture but certainly no Malay I know ever speaks like this.

All of them live with the constant need to find some way of reconciling their sexuality with their religion. It is difficult and most have to live a life of secrecy. But not once do they abandon all hope that God is always merciful, compassionate and full of love and, as one of them said, "always by my side." The Egyptian man who was imprisoned and raped said he got through his ordeal by always keeping his Quran by his side and reading it constantly. I don't know of anyone with more privileged lives who do that.

In the discussion afterwards, I said that the film was the best religious lesson that I ever had because it illustrated how Muslims, in times of adversity ( and God knows these men and women faced adversity beyond most of our imaginations), find their solace in religion because they had been taught all their lives that God is Merciful and Compassionate. And in fact, these are His most important attributes. It served to remind us who are constantly having to face so many issues regarding religion to be steadfast and to keep the faith.

One of the commenters after the film had asked why it was that Muslim gay people wanted to "have their cake and eat it" ie be Muslim AND gay. This assumes that there is simply no room for gay people in Islam. I had to respond to this because it is the same argument that Muslim feminists hear: how can you want equality between men and women and still be a Muslim? That comes from a profound misunderstanding of what Islam is, and confuses human interpretations and implementation of Islamic law with what I believe God intended. I find no references in the Quran that God said we should discriminate either between the sexes or between heterosexuals and homosexuals. So why would it not be possible to believe in equality before God?

Besides, who is anyone to tell me, any gay person or any Muslim for that matter, that they should not be Muslim just because your views are different from what is considered 'the norm'? If you are born and bred Muslim, the values, ethics and indeed rituals of Islam are part of what you are, the very fabric of what you are made. How does anyone simply abandon this? Indeed few people do and I would suggest when it happens it is often because there was nobody to explain to them what Islam really means, particularly by referring to the Quran. (And it is the Quran that says "there is no compulsion in religion"). Instead 'Islam' to them is exemplified by the political environment around them which tends to be harsh and extreme, and indeed far from the spirit of justice that Islam is built on.

Which brings us to the issue of the state and religion. It is clear that the men and women who have been forced into hiding or exile are not running away from God or their faith but just from the state. The state which justifies imprisoning, beating and killing in the name of religion. The young Iranian who finally goes to Canada may have left his family and country behind but he brought his faith with him. This was what caused him to collapse into tears once he landed in his new country; that he had been able to escape but not the many thousands of others who did not have the means to. He was not talking about escaping from God but only from the clutches of the state.

Indeed what moved me most about Jihad for Love was how intensely personal each person in it felt about his religion. It dispels the stereotype that homosexuals or transvestites are people without religion or have abandoned it. And it is clear, that no matter what the state does in the name of religion, it will not be able to erase Islam from the hearts of these people.

And that is our only weapon, those of us who have chosen to fight for equality and justice within Islam. That no matter what our detractors do to us - call for boycotts, censure, threaten us with harm - they cannot take Islam away from us. We may not be THEIR Muslims but we are Muslims nevertheless.
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  #85 Old 06-11-2011 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

Thanks joan! It's refreshing to find Muslims who think differently. I have friends like Marina Mahathir, but they are few. We need more people like them to erase all the hate purported in the name of religion. Have you watched A Jihad for Love by any chance?

By the way, everyone is free to post articles to this thread. If you find anything worth sharing, don't hesitate to do it! The more awareness, the better for all of us!
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What do you say,
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  #86 Old 06-11-2011 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

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Originally Posted by Dominic View Post
Thanks joan! It's refreshing to find Muslims who think differently. I have friends like Marina Mahathir, but they are few. We need more people like them to erase all the hate purported in the name of religion. Have you watched A Jihad for Love by any chance?

By the way, everyone is free to post articles to this thread. If you find anything worth sharing, don't hesitate to do it! The more awareness, the better for all of us!
Nope, I have cripplingly slow download speeds so yeah ):

Personally I think no one should use religion as an excuse to discriminate, because there is just no excuse when one thinks it is alright to be cruel or unkind towards certain groups just because.
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  #87 Old 06-11-2011 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

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Nope, I have cripplingly slow download speeds so yeah ):

Personally I think no one should use religion as an excuse to discriminate, because there is just no excuse when one thinks it is alright to be cruel or unkind towards certain groups just because.
If we ever meet up I'll pass it to you.

Though I wonder why all the gatherings never seem to materialize. Sigh....
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What do you say to jumping off the edge?
Never knowing if there's solid ground below
Or hand to hold, or hell to pay,
What do you say,
What do you say?"

And thus laments the hopeless romantic that is yours truly.
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  #88 Old 06-11-2011 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

Well I hope that ReCommers' Gathering happens this year, then =P Would love to meet you guys.
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  #89 Old 07-11-2011 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

Religion is no excuse to ignore the equal right of another person. Forgive me, I don't know the Koran as much that I can quote it perfectly. In Christianity (think of it as just food for thought, not shoving religion), Jesus taught each of His disciples and followers that the second most important command of the NT era is to love thy neighbour as your own. That means, unconditional and no bars, regardless what the person has done in their life. That principle applies to respecting and acknowledging people who were born differently or have different 'tastes' as human beings the same. Flawed but still a beautiful creation. Christianity does of course try to argue that it is sinful to be like that in the first place if you were not born that way, but was changed into a LGBT by social influence. Nonetheless, God is fair to judge. Whatever the circumstances a LGBT is put into, especially on how hopeless the person is to escape it, there is fairness in judgement. The other comforting fact is that God gives humanity a choice to choose for themselves how they want to live life, because to love someone is not by measure of force. Theist or not, that is one common ground I find that applies to us all.
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  #90 Old 07-11-2011 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

A brilliant piece that captures the essence of our battle for equality. Kudos to Ram Anand, someone who has managed to earn my respect in a single piece of writing.

Quote:
Why, oh why Malaysia, are you so ignorant?
Ram Anand

1:55PM Nov 6, 2011

I have one good friend. He is gay. No, he is not a friend that I ever attempted to avoid. In fact, I go to him whenever I need guidance and advise about the choices I make in life. If anything, he?s the busier one among the two of us. I set up appointments to make sure I keep in touch with him. He doesn?t gossip. He doesn?t fling his fingers around and bitch about his colleagues or friends to me.

He doesn?t have an obsession with muscles. He is not effeminate, nor is he masculine. He is successful, very successful, I would say. He?s a Hindu, but he has studied Islam. He has been a Christian missionary. He doesn?t have anything against religion. He never deviated from the path of God. If anything, he has more spirituality than I do. But people think I?m normal, whilst he is not.

Why, Malaysia?

I know of this one organisation - an organisation where hundreds of people call in everyday seeking for help. No, they are not seeking pardon from Lord for who they are. But they call in to have their voices heard, beneath the cloak they wear everyday when they walk to be part of the society.

They are on the brink of destruction. They feel like jumping off buildings. Some lost their jobs because of who they are. Some lose friends, family. Most are stripped off their dignity. They want to slit their wrists. So they call in, hanging on to one last final thread. All they want to hear is one thing- that there are others like them out there. They are not alone. But this organisation does not operate openly. They do it quietly, like an unwanted stash hidden somewhere under the surface of a society. When we sleep, there are plenty of tears here, stories of unrivalled misery and difficulty.

Isn?t it supposed to be very easy? Like they say, it?s a disease, a disorder of sorts that stems of deviating from a right path. Maybe when they lose jobs and are shunned to a corner, they could just wipe their tears and seek remorse? Go back to being ?normal?? But still they don?t see a life for themselves in such situations. They see it as the end.

Why, Malaysia?

I do not know the answers to what?s right or what?s wrong. I?m not pretending like I do. If these acts are indeed wrong, why aren?t we letting God decide? Why are we trying to do God?s job? Is it okay to hurt and shun another person who did no harm to you, or to any other person for that matter, just because you ?think? it?s wrong?

I look up at them. Yes, I do. Probably some might even think there?s nothing we can learn from them. Probably there is. Because we take so many things for granted in life. We coast through life without as much as swimming or in some cases, not even bothering to know what a struggle actually means.

Society has its uniforms, and we wear it everyday, making rounds and repeating our daily routines. And when we fall into a pit, like most of us do at some point of time, we whine and grapple to find a holder that can hoist us back up. We have the luxury of choosing our struggles. They probably don?t.

Can you imagine being stopped from loving someone? To love someone but unable to hold their hands? Or even loving someone with the knowledge that you can?t plan a future with him or her?

Or maybe if you think they are wrong to be who they are, why not live your life well and dignified to demonstrate that your path pays dividends? Why make a noise when others are not in tandem with you?

Probably because we are scared. We are afraid of that little of change, that little bit of acceptance. We are afraid because we might look in the mirror and feel our struggle is nothing compared to theirs. That our lives resemble cowardice compared to theirs. So we make them as our struggle.

But in this process, are we learning? If you are normal, you might not need to accept them, but the least you can do is to always open to your mind to what you can learn from your surroundings. Isn?t that the whole purpose of life itself, to learn and evolve with time?

No, not all gays couples comprise of effeminate and ultra masculine combinations. Not all transsexuals bitch and whine. Not all of them come from a poor upbringing. Then again, are we forgetting that even among us normal people, there are negative and positive characters?

Why, your thief, your carjacker, your acid splasher; are they not ?normal? people? Do we use some select characteristics to paint the same picture on an entire group of people? If that?s the case; all of us are robbers, murderers, and molesters, no?

What picture comes to your head when we talk about homosexuals? Is it that of a man kissing another man, or a woman kissing another woman?

That?s called sex. The word gender has a different meaning. If you think of sex while talking about gender, are we a generation who have completely thrown the crucial element called ?love? out of the window?

We marry and divorce as easy as the passing clouds. But they fight hard to keep even a single relationship going. To be accepted by friends and family. Why are we on our high horses? Do we know, or feel, what they went through or are going through?

Even if that is a disease, do you look down upon a person who has cancer?

Why, oh why Malaysia, are you so ignorant?


Ram Anand is a writer and novelist.
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"But what do you say to taking chances,
What do you say to jumping off the edge?
Never knowing if there's solid ground below
Or hand to hold, or hell to pay,
What do you say,
What do you say?"

And thus laments the hopeless romantic that is yours truly.
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