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Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

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  #181 Old 29-07-2012 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

http://www.todayonline.com/World/EDC...-sex-marriages

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Vietnam considers legalising same-sex marriages

Updated 01:55 PM Jul 29, 2012
HANOI - Dinh Thi Hong Loan grasps her girlfriend's hand, and the two gaze into each other's love-struck eyes. Smiling, they talk about their upcoming wedding - how they will exchange rings and toast the beginning of their lives together.

The lesbians' marriage ceremony in the Vietnamese capital will not be officially recognised, but that could soon change. Vietnam's Communist government is now considering whether to allow same-sex couples to marry or legally register and receive rights - positioning the country to be the first in Asia to do so.

"Our love for each other is real and nothing changes regardless of whether the law is passed or not," said Ms Loan, 31. "But when it is passed, we will definitely go get registered. I can't wait!"

Even longtime gay-rights activists are stunned by the Justice Ministry's proposal to include same-sex couples in its overhaul of the country's marriage law. No one knows what form it will take or whether it will survive long enough to be debated before the National Assembly next year, but supporters say the fact that it is even being considered is a victory in a region where simply being gay can result in jail sentences or whippings with a rattan cane.

"I think everyone is surprised,'' said Mr Vien Tanjung, an Indonesian gay-rights activist. Even if it's not successful it's already making history. For me, personally, I think it's going to go through."

Vietnam seems an unlikely champion of gay-rights issues. It is routinely lambasted by the international community over its dismal human rights record, often locking up political dissidents who call for democracy or religious freedom. Up until just a few years ago, homosexuality was labelled as a "social evil" alongside drug addiction and prostitution.

And Vietnam's gay community itself was once so underground that few groups or meeting places existed. It was taboo to even talk about the issue.

But over the past five years, that has slowly started to change. Vietnam's state-run media, unable to write about politically sensitive topics or openly criticise the one-party government, have embraced the chance to explore gay issues. They have run lengthy newspaper stories and television broadcasts, including one live special that won a top award.

Video of Vietnam's first publicised gay wedding went viral online in 2010, and a few other ceremonies followed, capturing widespread public attention. The Justice Ministry now says a legal framework is necessary because the courts do not know how to handle disputes between same-sex couples living together. The new law could provide rights such as owning property, inheriting and adopting children.

"I think, as far as human rights are concerned, it's time for us to look at the reality," Justice Minister Ha Hung Cuong said. "The number of homosexuals has mounted to hundreds of thousands. It's not a small figure. They live together without registering marriage. They may own property. We, of course, have to handle these issues legally."

Globally, 11 countries have legalized same-sex marriage since Holland became the first to do so in 2001. Only a few US states allow it, but President Barack Obama provided hope for many couples worldwide after announcing his support earlier this year. AP
Extremely interesting. I think this pretty much came out of nowhere, and regardless of whether or not it gets pushed through, just having them announce that they're considering it is a pretty big step. Especially since we can't envision anyone in most other Southeast Asian countries proposing the same.

It's also interesting that so-called more 'developed' nations in SEA haven't budged on the issue while Vietnam is possibly going to move forward. Malaysia aside (Muslim-majority country mah, would be more difficult) you'd expect a more secular state like Singapore to have gotten there first.
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  #182 Old 30-07-2012 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

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Extremely interesting. I think this pretty much came out of nowhere, and regardless of whether or not it gets pushed through, just having them announce that they're considering it is a pretty big step. Especially since we can't envision anyone in most other Southeast Asian countries proposing the same.

It's also interesting that so-called more 'developed' nations in SEA haven't budged on the issue while Vietnam is possibly going to move forward. Malaysia aside (Muslim-majority country mah, would be more difficult) you'd expect a more secular state like Singapore to have gotten there first.
I believe Singapore is moving forward, albeit rather slowly (Malaysia is still stuck in a rut). They had the PinkDot event earlier this year, of which attendance was growing tremendously by year. Utah even too the concept and held their own PinkDot, which shows how well-known the event is.

Perhaps other countries will eventually follow suit. We just need one country to start the ball rolling, and soon some of the less anti-gay countries will follow suit.

And by the way, the NZ MP's are finally going to vote on Marriage Equality. For those of you who don't know, civil unions have been legal in NZ since 2005. Interestingly, they also recognise de facto relationships, which are seen to be at the same level as marriages or civil unions. However, only married couples are allowed to adopt, and as a result of this, gay/lesbian couples have never been able to. This is why the people are now fighting hard for this Bill to be passed, so that these couples can finally adopt children of their own.

So I ask for your help now. Send a message to our MP's telling them how we feel about the issue. And maybe then the LGBT community in NZ will finally achieve true equality.
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Never knowing if there's solid ground below
Or hand to hold, or hell to pay,
What do you say,
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And thus laments the hopeless romantic that is yours truly.
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  #183 Old 30-07-2012 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

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I believe Singapore is moving forward, albeit rather slowly (Malaysia is still stuck in a rut). They had the PinkDot event earlier this year, of which attendance was growing tremendously by year. Utah even too the concept and held their own PinkDot, which shows how well-known the event is.

Perhaps other countries will eventually follow suit. We just need one country to start the ball rolling, and soon some of the less anti-gay countries will follow suit.

And by the way, the NZ MP's are finally going to vote on Marriage Equality. For those of you who don't know, civil unions have been legal in NZ since 2005. Interestingly, they also recognise de facto relationships, which are seen to be at the same level as marriages or civil unions. However, only married couples are allowed to adopt, and as a result of this, gay/lesbian couples have never been able to. This is why the people are now fighting hard for this Bill to be passed, so that these couples can finally adopt children of their own.

So I ask for your help now. Send a message to our MP's telling them how we feel about the issue. And maybe then the LGBT community in NZ will finally achieve true equality.
Singapore is more like a 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' state as it is, in my opinion. They aren't really going anywhere in terms of actually instituting pro-LGBT legal reforms, but they're letting the movement do their thing (which is much more than Malaysia can say).

And while I know they've also been quite tolerant of hiring LGBTs in the civil service, hopefully they'll take a step forward and pass some laws too.

I can't say that will have much of an effect on Malaysia though.
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  #184 Old 31-07-2012 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

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Singapore is more like a 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' state as it is, in my opinion. They aren't really going anywhere in terms of actually instituting pro-LGBT legal reforms, but they're letting the movement do their thing (which is much more than Malaysia can say).

And while I know they've also been quite tolerant of hiring LGBTs in the civil service, hopefully they'll take a step forward and pass some laws too.

I can't say that will have much of an effect on Malaysia though.
Malaysia used to be like that, then the elections and Ambiga came up and the government decided that the LGBT community would make excellent scapegoats. Hope all the hype dies down soon. I pity my friends back in Malaysia who will have to face even more discrimination nowadays.

In Singapore, much like Malaysia, you can't really walk around holding hands with your same-sex partner if you don't want to get stared at. I guess the same would apply in Malaysia.
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What do you say to jumping off the edge?
Never knowing if there's solid ground below
Or hand to hold, or hell to pay,
What do you say,
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  #185 Old 05-08-2012 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

Found something worth sharing here:

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Seven Years After Falling in Love in Croatia, Jon and Nedo Fight for their Marriage and the Right to be Together


Photo by Steven Rosen Photography

My name is Jon. In the photo above, I am the American guy on the right looking a bit choked up. I think it was taken just after the moment during our wedding when my husband Nedo stared into my eyes and told me that he was going to love me forever.

Let me go back in time and tell the story of how Nedo and I met. In April of 2005, I decided to take some time off from work and travel to Europe with the intent of finding a place I could live while I finished a college degree. I literally stumbled onto the Stradun in the charming medieval, walled city of Dubrovnik, Croatia. I fell in love with the country and its people, but one particular Croatian hunk ended up stealing my heart. Having been a pretty jaded guy living in San Francisco I had pretty much given up on my dream of finding a soul mate. Even typing that I still flinch a little bit because I know it just sounds so corny.

I remember sitting in a coffee bar on a warm September night near Pile Gate, an entrance to Old Town, as it is called, and seeing Nedo for the first time. He had come to the location because he had heard from one of the workers that there was a handsome American whom he should come check out. He was beautiful and I was enamored but we didn’t know at that moment that our paths were meant to cross again. The next time I saw him I was eating ice cream at another coffee shop. I was caught a little off guard and couldn’t understand why he was starting at me so I kind of hid a little bit behind an umbrella. We laugh about it today because he couldn’t believe I would try to hide from him. He was determined, as he proudly states today, to get to know me.

The next time I saw him was when I brought a friend from the U.S. into the store where Nedo worked. I didn’t realize the “hot Croatian guy” that I had telephoned my friend back home about worked at this store. It felt like fate was dealing us our cards. I was so happy to see him again. We got to talking and Nedo asked me for my cell phone number; he called me almost immediately after we left the store wanting to drop off a bracelet that he “fixed” for my friend. That, it turned out, was a pretext to get to know me better.

Since the day we first met, Nedo and I have not been apart with the exception of the seven months while we waited for him to come to the United States on his student visa. When I eventually ran out of money and I had to return home from Europe, I never expected that Nedo and I would find a way to maintain our relationship back in the U.S. It occurred to me while we were chatting online that if this man was going to give up his beautiful country, his wonderful friends, and move away from his family, how could I not welcome him with open arms in my country? To this day the effects of that decision on him to leave his family are deeply emotional and he can’t allow himself to communicate with them regularly because it is easier to disassociate then deal with the enormity of that decision. Every time he talks to his family he ends up crying for the remainder of the night. He misses his nieces and nephews terribly and it hurts him not to see them regularly. The fact that he is separated from his mother is something he can’t even fully grasp without his eyes swelling with tears. Due to his current legal status he cannot risk leaving the country for fear his visa will not be renewed, but this means he also must live with the knowledge that he may never see his parents again. They are getting older and the more time that goes by without him being able to visit is another form of torment for us as a gay binational American family. My husband experiences this pain often, and it causes me to resent my government for the pain our families suffer in the name of DOMA.

I had to borrow $18,000 from my sister to prove that I could sponsor Nedo for a student visa. I worked two jobs to pay for his tuition and our rent in one of the most expensive cities in the U.S. We went through very tough financial times in the beginning of our relationship. The stress took a severe toll on my mental and physical health. Nedo was not used to relying on others to take care of him, and he also suffered from not being able to contribute financially to our household.

Eventually, we settled into a domestic routine. Nedo went to school full-time, but almost every day he cooked our meals and did laundry; he even folded and ironed the sheets! He meticulously planned every holiday and decorated at least three trees on Christmas. Nedo took care of me as much as I took care of him, and he made our home and life together. Nedo has become an important part of my family. He is “Uncle Nedo” to my nieces, a brother to my sisters, and a cousin to my cousins. We celebrate every Thanksgiving at the home of my born-again Christian brother and his fourth wife. Numerous members of our extended family members support us in our cause for Marriage Equality, recognizing that our fight to be together is not a gay or straight issue, but an issue of our common humanity as a family. Virtually, everyone who has come into our lives knows and supports us in our struggle to stay together and cannot believe that there is a chance Nedo might be taken away from all of us.

Nedo has given me everything and has taught me the true meaning of partnership and unconditional love. He is the love of my life and he is a source of inspiration to all in our life. It makes me tear up even just thinking of how much love he has shown for me and my family. There are ways that this man has supported me that do not lend themselves easily to words. He is faithfully and religiously by my side. I feel blessed to be able to share life, our friends and family together. What we have in our lives together today is something we have both dreamed of all of our lives. We would love to be able to think of our future and how we want to have a home in California and a summer residence in Croatia close to his family. We dream of owning our own business to support ourselves but none of it can fully become a reality when living your life in constant fear of not knowing what the future holds. We would love more then anything to buy a house and know that it will always be our home together. Such simple dreams often seem impossible for us as a gay binational couple.

I remember the day in 2008 when the Supreme Court of California ruled that gay couples could marry. It was the first time I realized that Nedo and I could marry. At that moment I was ambivalent. I had been told that Nedo may complicate his visa status if we were married because it could be interpreted as an indication of intent to remain in the United States. (I later realized that much of the concern around marriage and visa status stems from a lack of understanding of these issues.) Importantly, though, something in my mind changed that day. With respect to my relationship to Nedo, to our love, I felt like every other American. I felt worthy. I felt that we had the chance to feel equal. Finally, I was in love with a wonderful man who I would actually want to marry and now the most wonderful and surprising thing had happened: a court ruling had made it all possible.

As everyone reading this knows by now, our right to marry ended up being put to a vote and it was taken away by a slim majority of Californians. It felt like a punch in gut. I was so upset that I lost a lot of hope in my own country at that moment. I remember the opposing side of Prop 8 using Obama’s statement about marriage and feeling let down that the President didn’t aggressively speak out in opposition to the Proposition. Nedo even met Nancy Pelosi at a book signing event in San Francisco and brought up the fact that I could not sponsor him for a green card because of DOMA. She said “I know; it’s a disgrace and we need to change that.” Nice words, but that’s all they were. Over the next few years we became increasingly frustrated when the response from our elected officials essentially became, “what choice do we have but wait for change?” We have started to realize that change is not something you wait for; it’s something you make happen.

I get upset when I think about the taxes I have paid over the years to my government only to be treated like a second-class citizen, while other people, like my brother, who is on his fourth marriage, get unlimited chances to pursue their happiness. As an American citizen I cannot stand by and allow my love for Nedo to be treated as though it is less valuable than my brother’s marriages.

A dream came true for us last August, when a birthday trip to New York for Nedo ended up being so much more than just a visit to the Statue of Liberty! On July 24th, New York State’s marriage equality law went into effect, so about a week before our trip I asked Nedo if after six years together was he would marry me while we were in New York. Nedo and I had concerns about jeopardizing his visa status; however, we both decided our commitment was worth the risk especially since his visa expires in February 2013. We arranged for Reverend Annie Lawrence to conduct our ceremony and hired photographer Stephen Rosen to take pictures of our Bow Bridge wedding in Central Park. Its hard to put into words the feelings and emotions we both felt that day while saying our vows. What we have is special and the experience of being able to legally commit ourselves in a ceremony like all other loving couples was a once in a lifetime, joyful experience.

Nedo and I live in San Francisco today and we are very blessed. We have been through a lot together and have always been taken care of. We have a certain faith in our respective higher powers that our love is special and that we will be taken care of.

Each year we participate in the Diversity Visa Green Card Lottery and this last year was especially bitter for us as we are running out of time on Nedo’s visa. The Green Card Lottery is our final hope. Nedo is tired of being in school and cannot continue to study as his heart is not in it. He also misses his family terribly and wants to see them badly. Because his visa will be up in February of 2013 we are running out of options.

We can no longer put off conversations about what will happen to us next year. If Nedo stays after his visa ends, how will we manage without being able to maintain lawful status? He will be stuck and unable to see his family in Europe, and we will be forced to live in fear that he will be deported. If we find no other solution, he will be forced to leave the United States, bringing our relationship to an end. We have talked about long distance relationships and do not believe it is fair for either of us to put one another through that. But we can’t imagine being torn apart. Will we stay and fight or will our love and lives be broken apart? This is devastating for us to think about this but this is our reality. Every day we inch closer to the expiration of his student visa without a solution. Living with this uncertainty and fear is like an ache in your heart that never goes away.

It’s been hard for me to write this story. I have spent all of my life in sales and promote things that have “value propositions” and am always discovering the needs of others and making recommendations. I am writing this story because I need help keeping the man I love with all my heart in this country.

Nedo has family and friends in Croatia. What he doesn’t have there is the life we have built together in the United States with our friends and family. We have worked very hard to put together an amazing home and a life for us as a couple. I want to take care of him and provide for him for the remainder of his life. I want for him to be legally recognized as my husband in the United States. I want for us to be able to go home to Croatia together and see his face when he hugs his mother. I want to see his mother for the first time with her knowing that I am Nedo’s husband. I want us to have the same rights and the same joys in life that every heterosexual couple takes for granted.

We will fight to have all of that. Getting married in 2011 was the first step in that direction. Now we will fight for our marriage. We will not wait for change to happen. That is why we have joined The DOMA Project. We encourage other couples to fight for their love, to tell their stories and to hold our government accountable for DOMA. Together we can stop this law from tearing us apart, destroying our families and our dreams, forcing us to live in exile or across the globe from those we love most. We have the power to end this now.
Taken from: http://www.stopthedeportations.com/b...-together.html

And finally, something positive to share:

Quote:
VICTORY! Obama Administration Recognizes Marriages of Gay and Lesbian Binational Couples, Expanding Deportation Policy to LGBT Families

Yesterday, in a statement to BuzzFeed, Deputy Press Secretary for the Department of Homeland Security announced a surprising shift in the policy of the Obama administration with respect to married same-sex couples facing deportation: “[W]hen exercising prosecutorial discretion in enforcement matters, DHS looks at the totality of the circumstances presented in individual cases, including whether an individual has close family ties to the United States as demonstrated by his or her same-sex marriage or other longstanding relationship to a United States citizen.” August 1, 2012

August 2, 2012 statement by Attorney Lavi Soloway, founder Stop The Deportations – The DOMA Project:

“After a two-year campaign urging the Obama administration to stop the deportations of spouses of gay and lesbian Americans, we welcome the announcement by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that it will formally recognize same-sex marriages as part of its year-old ‘prosecutorial discretion’ deportation policy and other related enforcement matters.

“By articulating the first federal policy to specifically recognize marriages of gay and lesbian couples as a basis for agency action, the Obama administration has indicated to deportations officers, Immigration Judges, and Immigration & Customs Enforcement prosecutors, and Citizenship and Immigration Services adjudicators that our marriages must be considered when determining whether a case is deemed low priority for deportation. The Administration should issue clear guidance memorializing this announcement without delay so that all families can be protected under a clear, consistently applied prosecutorial discretion policy.

“This move is significant beyond the immigration context, as it constitutes the first time any agency of the federal government has created a policy explicitly recognizing same-sex marriages.

“By giving legal effect to the lawful marriages of gay and lesbian couples, the Obama administration has demonstrated what we have argued all along to be true: that executive branch agencies can create policies to mitigate the discriminatory impact of DOMA on gay and lesbian binational couples, even while DOMA continues to prevent approval of those couples’ green card petitions.

“Last summer a senior administration official promised, in a background briefing to the media, to take into account ‘LGBT families’ in its deportation policy. DHS backtracked from that language in October 2011, when it issued a letter to members of Congress stating only the ‘community ties’ of LGBT individuals facing deportation would be considered, which unambiguously abandoned the previous, more inclusive reference to ‘LGBT families.’

“Yesterday’s announcement acknowledging the marriages of gay and lesbian couples is a giant step forward honoring the struggle of thousands of loving couples who are subject to DOMA’s most punishing consequences. Hundreds of determined and brave binational couples who demanded an end to ‘DOMA deportations’ deserve tremendous credit for moving elected officials and the administration forward on this issue.

“Still, gay and lesbian Americans are not able to sponsor their spouses for green cards because of DOMA, depriving married couples of the right to build a future together, tearing apart families by separating spouses from each other and, in many cases, from their children.

“To address this immediate, irreparable harm, the administration should stop denying green card petitions filed by gay and lesbian binational couples and instead put those cases on hold pending a ruling by the Supreme Court on the constitutionality of DOMA expected next year. We are hopeful that the White House will follow today’s announcement with additional measures that will bring all lesbian and gay binational couples one step closer to full equality.”
Taken from: http://www.stopthedeportations.com/b...-families.html
__________________
"But what do you say to taking chances,
What do you say to jumping off the edge?
Never knowing if there's solid ground below
Or hand to hold, or hell to pay,
What do you say,
What do you say?"

And thus laments the hopeless romantic that is yours truly.

Last edited by Dominic; 05-08-2012 at 11:07 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #186 Old 06-08-2012 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

I find it good that this thread gives information about the development of law regarding LGBT issues in various countries like the US and Vietnam. It would be good if there are more posts about the development of acts and laws regarding LGBT and the recognition of such marriages. Great job to those who have contributed such articles.

Just a link to an article about the United Nations' take on the LGBT issue:
http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=40743

Last edited by Mirianchoo; 06-08-2012 at 10:52 PM.
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  #187 Old 07-08-2012 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

This is a rather interesting discovery.

Quote:
Pupil Dilation Reveals Sexual Orientation in New Study

ScienceDaily (Aug. 6, 2012) — There is a popular belief that sexual orientation can be revealed by pupil dilation to attractive people, yet until now there was no scientific evidence. For the first time, researchers at Cornell University used a specialized infrared lens to measure pupillary changes to participants watching erotic videos. Pupils were highly telling: they widened most to videos of people who participants found attractive, thereby revealing where they were on the sexual spectrum from heterosexual to homosexual.

The findings were published August 3 in the scientific journal PLoS ONE.
Previous research explored these mechanisms either by simply asking people about their sexuality, or by using physiological measures such as assessing their genital arousal. These methods, however, come with substantial problems.

"We wanted to find an alternative measure that would be an automatic indication of sexual orientation, but without being as invasive as previous measures. Pupillary responses are exactly that," says Gerulf Rieger, lead author and research fellow at Cornell. "With this new technology we are able to explore sexual orientation of people who would never participate in a study on genital arousal, such as people from traditional cultures. This will give us a much better understanding how sexuality is expressed across the planet."

The new Cornell study adds considerably more to the field of sexuality research than merely a novel measure. As expected, heterosexual men showed strong pupillary responses to sexual videos of women, and little to men; heterosexual women, however, showed pupillary responses to both sexes. This result confirms previous research suggesting that women have a very different type of sexuality than men.

Moreover, the new study feeds into a long-lasting debate on male bisexuality. Previous notions were that most bisexual men do not base their sexual identity on their physiological sexual arousal but on romantic and identity issues. Contrary to this claim, bisexual men in the new study showed substantial pupil dilations to sexual videos of both men and women.

"We can now finally argue that a flexible sexual desire is not simply restricted to women -- some men have it, too, and it is reflected in their pupils," says Ritch C. Savin-Williams, co-author and professor in Human Development at Cornell. "In fact, not even a division into 'straight,' 'bi,' and 'gay' tells the full story. Men who identity as 'mostly straight' really exist both in their identity and their pupil response; they are more aroused to males than straight men, but much less so than both bisexual and gay men," Savin-Williams notes.

The researchers are confident that their new measure will aid in understanding these groups better and point to a range of sexualities that has been ignored in previous research.
Taken from: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0806084533.htm
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"But what do you say to taking chances,
What do you say to jumping off the edge?
Never knowing if there's solid ground below
Or hand to hold, or hell to pay,
What do you say,
What do you say?"

And thus laments the hopeless romantic that is yours truly.
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  #188 Old 13-08-2012 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

This is pretty darn cool.

Quote:
After uphill legal battle, gay couple jointly adopts 12 kids

Steven and Roger Ham wanted to ensure the children they’d adopted out of foster care would get all the same benefits that adoptees of a straight couple would have — not an easy thing to do in Arizona.

It took some legal wrangling – and a lawyer’s generosity – but Steven and Roger Ham are now officially the dads to 12 children they adopted from foster care.

Together for nearly 19 years, the two men live with their kids in Arizona, where gay couples can’t get married or adopt children together, the Arizona Republic reported.

Steven, 44, was able to adopt 10 of the children in his home state. But they were only legally bound to him. They would be denied health care, Social Security, inheritance rights and child support if anything happened to 48-year-old Roger or if the couple split.

The other two kids were adopted in Washington, where same-sex couples are allowed to adopt.

Roger had his last name legally changed to Ham in 2007 to bring the family closer together. He and Steven drew up legal papers to transfer guardianship from one man to the other if either died, and made arrangements so both would be permitted to pick the kids up from school.
That was the best they could do until attorney Shelly Krebs stepped in.

Krebs arranged their two joint adoptions in Washington. She offered to handle re-adoption of the other 10 kids in the same state – which would normally cost about $15,000 – for about a tenth of that sum. Steven and Roger Ham jumped at the chance.

"As a businessperson, it's a little more paperwork, and it's a little more time for me," she told the Arizona Republic, but "the world is not always about time and money.”

On July 13, Steven and Roger both legally became the 12 kids’ fathers

"We were already a family," 14-year-old Michael Ham said. But as his sister Vanessa, 17, put it, "Now you can actually say, it's really my dads.”
Taken from: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nati...#ixzz23NTE0IlK
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"But what do you say to taking chances,
What do you say to jumping off the edge?
Never knowing if there's solid ground below
Or hand to hold, or hell to pay,
What do you say,
What do you say?"

And thus laments the hopeless romantic that is yours truly.
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  #189 Old 14-09-2012 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

So, upon reading and having an almighty laugh at our Education Department on their blatant homophobia and narrow-mindedness, I couldn't help but think, what is your opinion on the recent "guidelines"?
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  #190 Old 14-09-2012 Default Re: Dominic's Dominion of LGBT Issues

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Originally Posted by FoxyWoxy25 View Post
So, upon reading and having an almighty laugh at our Education Department on their blatant homophobia and narrow-mindedness, I couldn't help but think, what is your opinion on the recent "guidelines"?
That's blatant cow dung. They should focus more tackling issues which are dividing Malaysians, not dividing them even more.
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